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Margaret Mead

April 18 1957

A clarification that the “Men” in the title refers to Mankind. A brief reference to the speaker’s last trip back to the Pacific where she had previously studied a group of people 25 years ago. Observations and changes 25 years later. The conclusion that “if people are going to have to make a really radical change it is better to have everything support the change.” International relations. The kind of symbols that we have for international relations and our relations to each other. Questions that people in other parts of the world may be asking about Canada, and Canada’s changing role in the world which is changing so rapidly. The possibility that it might be a very good idea for us to scrap most of the ways in which we are thinking about other nations and of one’s own nation. Some remarks on Canada and Canadians. Ways in which we try to understand Canada, for example, by a kind of cross-referencing between the United Kingdom and the United States. The vote of thanks in Canada and what that characterizes. The under-statement and over-statement position. The various images that we use about different countries. Playing upon the differences between the United States and Canada. The use of the word “family” in international relations. A discussion of familiar images and their associations. Looking at models. The Soviet Union model. The Free World model. The concept of nations waxing, waning, and being in a state of youth, adolescence and senescence. Ways of looking at Canada. Some changes Canada will be facing. More useful ways of thinking about nations.